Dysport vs Botox: Which One to Choose?

What do you likely hear when you come to get botulinum toxin injections? I assume it’s something like, “Which product do you want to use? Dysport or Botox?” Most patients don’t know the difference and ask their injector to help them choose. If you’re lucky enough, your provider will give you a suitable recommendation. However, some inexperienced injectors can be at a loss. What to do in this case? You should take matters into your own hands and prepare in advance. Dysport vs Botox can be surprisingly well-exciting competitors.

Dysport vs Botox

What is Botox?

Botox is a drug of the American company Allergan obtained from a toxin produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. The main functions of this drug are to reduce skin wrinkles and help relieve some medical conditions. It was first approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in 1989 to treat twitching and crossed eyes.

In 2002, Botox broke into aesthetic medicine and became an official cosmetic treatment for frown lines. As of 2017, Allergan earned about $3.2 billion from sales of Botox worldwide. According to the recent statistics, the demand for its product will keep growing and increase to about $4.6 billion by 2024.

What is Dysport?

Dysport is a “younger brother” of Botox made by Ipsen in France. If we root deep into history, we discover some interesting facts. In the early 1970s, Alan Scott, the “Father of Botox,” trained his UK doctors in treating strabism with botulinum toxin injections. When the British returned home, they realized that this drug can be an effective option for other diseases.

Dysport was first approved in Europe for the treatment of muscle spasms in 1990. Today, it is the only FDA-approved botulinum toxin treatment to cure pediatric spasticity. In 2009, Dysport eventually gained FDA trust as an aesthetic treatment. Like Botox, it is made from the same active ingredient – Clostridium botulinum toxin type A and has an identical injection technique. So what’s the difference?

Dysport vs Botox

  Dysport Botox
Amount of Drug in a Vial 300 Units or 500 Units of freeze-dried botulinum neurotoxin type-A 50 Units, 100 Units, or 200 Units of vacuum-dried botulinum neurotoxin type-A
Additional Components 0.125 milligrams of human albumin, which softens the action of the BT and reduces its diffusion

2,5 mg of lactose monohydrate. This is a classical excipient in pharmacology, used to obtain dosage forms
0.5 mg of human albumin, which softens the action of the BT and reduces its diffusion

0.9 mg of sodium chloride – component, which helps to dissolve the crystalline complex of BT

Molecular Weight
(the smaller it is, the more evenly the drug is distributed over the muscle)
800 kDa 900 kDa
Indications Facial wrinkles, muscle spasms of the body, and excessive sweating Facial wrinkles, muscle spasms of the body, and excessive sweating
Drug Calculations 1 U of Botox equals 3 Units of Dysport 1 Unit of Botox equals 3 Units of Dysport
Price Per Unit $4-$8 in the US $10-$20 in the US
Average Final Cost:
(It is based on the following factors: how prominent your wrinkles are, how aggressively you want to treat them, and consequently the amount of drug injected)
$466, according to 2020 statistics from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons $466, according to 2020 statistics from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons
Onset of Action 24 hours 72 hours
Effect Duration  4-5 months  2-3 months
Side Effects Mild pain, bruising at injection sites, headache, temporary brow ptosis

People with a true milk allergy are best to avoid Dysport because it contains lactose
Mild pain, bruising at injection sites, headache, temporary brow ptosis

Botox is absolutely safe for people with milk allergy

Dysport vs Botox: What to Choose?

Dysport and Botox are similar yet different. They both contain the same active ingredient – botulinum toxin type A but have different molecular weights and additives.

Dysport has less albumin, and its molecular weight is lower than Botox. It is easy to spread to neighboring areas, so it best suits moderate to severe frown lines like glabella and forehead wrinkles.

Botox is more precise and doesn’t spread a lot, making it more suitable for small wrinkles like crow’s feet or vertical lip lines. In addition, it doesn’t contain lactose and will be well-tolerated by people with a true milk allergy.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.